Veteran’s Park of Holyoke

This is part of the Holyoke Heritage Trail so after visiting here get back onto the trail.

Stop 1 – Veteran’s Park

On January 22 1962 Hampden Park was rededicated and renamed Veteran’s Park. The park has memorials to war dead from the Civil War, World War 2, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. It also has many beautiful buildings surrounding it. Hampden Park is on the National Register of Historic Places. For a tour of many Holyoke buildings and districts on the register go to this LINK.

The men from Holyoke that died during the Spanish American War are honored at Holyoke State Armory where there is a plaque. See the LINK to read about them.

Stop 2 – Civil War Memorial

statue in Veterans’ ParkColumbia
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The Civil War Memorial honors those that died in that war that lived in Holyoke. Thomas Holman the second one down on the eastern side and James Burr the 5th one down are the only ones buried in Holyoke. The rest are buried at the war sites.

Names of the Civil War deaths of Holyoke with death dates and locations.

This statue was made by Henry Jackson Ellicott in 1876. It was dedicated on July 4th of that year. It symbolizes Columbia in the traditional classical attire but with the implements of Nike the Greek Goddess of Victory. Columbia holds her shield at her side and her laurel wreath only half high. She also faces to the south. These characteristics imply that the defeat of the South was hard fought and tiring. But she wants the South to rejoin the North and will not gloat over a victory. Her garments and her star-rimmed cap are those of Columbia – the symbol of America. Columbia here has a belt bucket with US printed on it. Liberty never had these symbols. Columbia was the female symbol of America from the 1730s to the early 1920s. Thus this statue is Columbia with Nike symbols and not Lady Liberty.

Stop 3 – Medal of Honor

John MacKenzie, Raymond Beaudoin, and Joseph Muller are the three Medal of Honor men from Holyoke.

Raymond Beaudoin is buried in South Hadley at the Notre Dame Cemetery. (FINDAGRAVE)

Joseph Muller is buried in Honolulu Hawaii at the Cemetery of the Pacific. (FINDAGRAVE)

John MacKenzie is the only one buried in Holyoke since he is at the Forestdale Cemetery. (FINDAGRAVE)

Stop 4 – Fire Station

The Holyoke Fire Central Station was at that location for many decades. It is the second of three central fire station in Holyoke. As the force became motorized it needed a better station and hence this one was made. There are three phases of the fire fighting department in Holyoke. The first wave was that equipment was stored in sheds and the force was small. The second wave was stations around the city including this one and the Emerald Fire Station on Chestnut Street. The third wave is the modern one. For an extended tour walk to High Street to see some of its wonderful buildings. Use this LINK.

Stop 5 – Saint Jerome’s Society

The Saint Jerome Total Abstinence, Mutual, Benevolent, and Literary Society was near this corner. It still stands but with facade greatly changed. It was a society for men from the Saint Jerome Church.

Stop 6 – World War 2 Memorial

This memorial honors the 212 men that died in WW2 that lived in Holyoke. Ignatius Maternowski was a chaplain from Holyoke that died on D-Day. He was buried on the beaches of Normandy but three years later was reinterred in South Hadley at the Mater Dolorosa Cemetery. Across Dwight Street from this memorial was the Roswell Crafts house. It was a beautiful and unique home.

Stop 7 – Holyoke Post Office

The Holyoke Post Office has been here since 1936. It was made as a WPA project. This is the 6th location of the central post office of Holyoke. The first was at Craft Tavern, the 2nd at the railroad station, the 3rd and the 4th at the Hotel Hamilton, and 5th at a building behind that hotel. Before the post office was put here, the Park Hotel was here.

Stop 8 – Immaculate Conception of Notre Dame School

The Notre Dame School was started in 1868 along Hampden Street. A new structure was built along Chestnut Street in 1886. This served as a girls school and then a coed school. In 1910 it was renamed St Jerome School. It in 1963 it became Holyoke Catholic High School.

Stop 9 – Saint Jerome Church

The Saint Jerome parish was started in 1858. It burnt to the ground in 1934 and was rebuilt.

stop 10 – Convent of the Sisters of Saint Joseph

See much more at this LINK since the block around the campus is a separate tour.